Demystifying LED Lighting

Demystifying LED Lighting

LED – light emitting diodes.

We are seeing and hearing more about them since incandescent lights were to be rendered obsolete in January 2014 but congressional leaders postponed the official phase out for the time being. Manufactures however are continuing to move ahead with higher efficiency lighting leaving incandescent by the wayside. When you walk into big box stores they have large displays which to someone not familiar with this “new” lighting might be a little confused by it.

led comparison

https://www.energyearth.com/general/categories/lighting/learn-more

Although LED lighting can be costly up front, they have a long life and come in many colors- more about that further on; so they are not as harsh as florescent bulbs. Amazingly they use 80% less electricity than incandescent lights, 20% less than CFL -compact florescent lights which are slowly fading away. They provide great light for almost any general application, yet LED lighting has less than 5% penetration in the lighting market. As more consumers and commercial uses install LED lighting it could cut lighting based energy consumptions significantly. High powered LEDs deliver better performance in a more effect way.

Installing LED’s should be considered an investment that will save you money over a longer period of time. Prices of LED have been coming down; there are now an increased number of choices when it comes to color quality. LED lights can last 20 years and will cost about a $1 per year using it on average for three hours per day. With the prices coming down the payback time shortens making LED lighting worth the initial investment.

There are differences between incandescent and CFL and LED lighting. LED lights can be more efficient, durable, versatile and longer lasting. Sophisticated engineering is needed to produce light similar to an incandescent bulb. The brightness of bulb needs to be evaluated differently. Just as we had to move from candle power to thinking in watts; for LED lights, the brightness is measured in lumens. Unlike incandescent lights where there is still a direct correlation in our perception between brightness and watts, the amount of energy a bulb draws; not so with LED’s. The larger the lumen or brighter the light, does not mean more gobs of energy is being consumed.

led brightness

http://www.cnet.com/how-to/five-things-to-consider-before-buying-led-bulbs/

 

LED’s come in a wide range of colors which can be confusing to some. The color temperature is measured in units called Kelvin. To keep it simple they designate the light as “warm white” more yellow and “soft white” which are similar in hue to what incandescent lights produce. “Bright white” are bluer, similar to daylight; this application could be seen in stores and businesses. There is no rule as to which to use in a space, it is really more personal preference, and they can be mixed in a room to give the proper light. Some suggestions would be:

Warm white – living room, bedroom, hallway

Soft white- kitchen, study, bathroom, cupboard, office

Bright white-board room, retail space

LED’s can be used in an array of different applications not only for table top lighting but also accent lights, recess lighting, under counter lighting and chandeliers in home lighting and commercial use. With the direction to go towards energy efficiency LED’s should be a consideration when using lights in a home.

 

 

 

 

 


About the Author
Author

Karen GP

Comments (3)
Leave a reply

Name (required)

Website

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.